ICTP - Action Plans - Challenge 3

Insufficient capacity and/or connectivity hinders local and regional movement.

The recommended actions for addressing Challenge 3 are summarised in Table 6-3.


Table 6-3 Recommended Actions to address Challenge 3

Action 3a Work with PTV, DEDJTR and federal government to reinforce the priority of resolving peak capacity and comfort issues on V/Line trains to and from Melbourne.
Action 3b Investigate alternative forms of public transport linking Melbourne and Geelong, including commuter buses and ferries to help reduce peak period capacity constraints on V/Line train services.
Action 3c

Investigate low-cost opportunities (i.e. travel demand management solutions) to manage the peak period demand on Melbourne – Geelong V/Line train services.

Action 3d Work with PTV and V/Line to derive rolling stock configurations that reflect the specific transport needs of the Geelong to Melbourne rail corridor.
Action 3e

Work with state and federal government to develop local job-creation strategies in a range of industries, to reduce the need for workers from the City of Greater Geelong to commute to Melbourne.

Action 3f Lobby state and federal government to prioritise an alternative river crossing to the West Gate Bridge. Action 3g Lobby VicRoads, DEDJTR and Surf Coast Shire Council to reserve a public transport corridor between Geelong and Torquay.
Action 3h Lobby PTV to improve public transport connections between the Surf Coast and Geelong so there are more attractive public transport alternatives to private car travel.
Action 3i Work with V/Line and PTV to develop Station Access Plans for all railway stations within Geelong.
Action 3j Work with PTV, active transport groups, and bus operators to improve the marketing of non-car travel from satellite towns and suburbs in the City of Greater Geelong.
Action 3k Develop a framework for prioritising infrastructure investment by the City of Greater Geelong for actions recommended in this Plan that are the responsibility of Council.
Action 3l Lobby PTV to develop a regional minimum service standard and a policy for minimum level of public transport use in the City of Greater Geelong.
Action 3m Work with state government to develop a long-term rail plan for Geelong that addresses local and regional transport needs.
Action 3n Implement the recommendations from the Central Geelong Car Parking and Access Strategy. Action 3o Implement the recommendations from the Geelong Road Safety Strategy. Action 3p Implement the recommendations from the G21 Public Transport Strategy.
Action 3q

Work with PTV and V/Line to prioritise disability-related improvements to bus and rail infrastructure, including buses, V/Line rolling-stock, stations and bus stops.


The City of Greater Geelong is committed to advocating for improved public transport and associated infrastructure, including Geelong Railway Station, so that public transport becomes a viable alternative to private car travel in Geelong.

This initiative will begin changing the community’s car dependant culture. Council will continue to engage with State Government to improve public transport for local and regional trips. Council recognises that presenting the community with compelling public transport options is a central pillar of any strategy that seeks to foster mode shift away from car use.

Council is committed to securing the road network improvements needed by community and business in the City of Greater Geelong. This is a key focus of the Plan and Council will engage with state government to investigate more efficient ways to move people and goods between key destinations. The West Gate Bridge provides a key transport link between Geelong and the Melbourne CBD and Council recognises the importance of investigating alternative river crossings to improve the resilience of this critical link.

Developing a road safety strategy and car parking and access strategy for the City of Greater Geelong has involved significant investment, and Council will continue to implement the recommendations of these studies.

Below is a summary of the actions recommended to address the challenge of insufficient capacity and/or connectivity that hinders local and regional movement.

Action 3a – Work with state and federal government to resolve peak period capacity and comfort on Geelong - Melbourne V/Line train services

The V/Line train services operating between Geelong and Melbourne are a key transport link, offering an alternative to private car travel between the two cities.

Nearly 12,000 Geelong people commute to Melbourne for employment, with a further 3,700 Melbourne people commuting to Geelong. This level of demand highlights the importance of a high quality public transport link between the two cities, offering an attractive alternative to private car travel.

To implement this action requires consultation with a range of stakeholders, including PTV, V/Line, DEDJTR and the Federal Government. Resolving the peak period capacity and comfort issues on V/Line trains to and from Melbourne is an immediate concern. But it is also a longterm concern given the population growth forecast in Geelong and Victoria’s Barwon region.

When the Regional Rail Link (RRL) opens in 2015, it will increase the peak network capacity with a further three trains over the peak two hours. However, this increase in services is unlikely to successfully mitigate the longterm peak period capacity constraints, and it will be necessary to investigate further long-term measures.

Council needs to lobby all levels of government, while working closely with V/Line to find immediate solutions and developing a long-term plan for this important rail link.

Action 3b – Investigate alternative forms of public transport linking Melbourne and Geelong

Further investigation is needed into alternative forms of public transport services to alleviate pressure on the peak period V/Line train services. Alternatives might include commuter bus/coach or ferry services. Geelong residents who must travel elsewhere in Victoria, not just to the Melbourne CBD, also need to be considered. Also for consideration are the post RRL changes to the Geelong rail line and how they will impact passengers. For example, there will be fewer access opportunities to other destinations such as Werribee.

Council will need to consult with PTV in relation to their regional Victoria public transport plan.

Action 3c – Investigate low cost opportunities to manage the peak period demand on Melbourne – Geelong V/Line train services

The key focus of this action is about understanding travel needs and identifying alternative transport opportunities that do not place additional pressure on congested networks.

Further research is needed to identify options for reducing travel demand, such as spreading the demand across a longer peak period, or minimising the number of trips undertaken through initiatives such as tele-working.

Further data collection and analysis will help generate understanding of the ways scheduled express and stopping-all-stations services influence passengers’ decisions about the services they use, which services experience the highest level of over-crowding, and how the reliability of services impacts over-crowding.

Action 3d – Work with V/Line to investigate rolling stock configurations that reflect customers’ needs on the Geelong – Melbourne rail corridor

V/Line rolling stock was not designed to serve a large and growing commuter market. For that reason, the rolling stock configuration is not suited to carrying a large number of passengers for long journeys (i.e. >1 hour), in comparison with Melbourne suburban train services.

The unique characteristics of the Geelong – Melbourne rail corridor need to be understood from a range of perspectives, including market segments, loadings, and operating environment. To understand the need and opportunities for re-configuring the rolling-stock to increase capacity requires further investigation, and consultation with V/Line and the general community. It is important to balance the needs of all market segments using the service, while maximising the efficiency of each service. Australian and international research could be incorporated to understand how other similar regional cities balance peak period commuter needs with long distance rail travel comfort.

It is also important to consider Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) requirements as well as carriage of bicycles on V/Line services in any new rolling-stock reconfigurations. The flow-on effects of any rolling-stock changes needs to be considered, in particular throughrouting of trains onto longer journeys such as Traralgon- Bairnsdale and between Geelong and Warrnambool.

Action 3e – Work with state and federal government to develop strategies to create local employment that reduces the need to commute to Melbourne

There is a strong link between employment and transport: people need to access the transport system to connect them with employment nodes. A significant proportion of Geelong’s labour force commutes to Melbourne for employment since Geelong is both a desirable location to live and a reasonable commute distance to Melbourne. But also because demand outstrips supply for highly skilled and highly paid jobs in Geelong, which increases the number of commuter trips to Melbourne.

Identifying opportunities to increase knowledge sector jobs within the Geelong economy could help reduce the demand for commuting to Melbourne. The City of Greater Geelong will need to lobby state and federal government for grant funding that will attract knowledge sector jobs to Geelong. The first step towards this is to investigate what the knowledge industry requires to consider Geelong a viable location – what Geelong has, what is doesn’t have, and what governments can contribute towards bridging the gaps.

Action 3f – Lobby state and federal government to build an alternative river crossing to the West Gate Bridge

The West Gate Bridge is a strategic transport link between Geelong and Melbourne. The importance of this link is highlighted by the shortage of viable alternative river crossings.

Council will lobby state and federal government to convey the importance of an alternative river crossing for Geelong and all Melbourne’s western suburbs.

Action 3g – Lobby VicRoads, DEDJTR and Surf Coast Shire Council to reserve a public transport corridor between Geelong and Torquay

As outlined in Action 3h, public transport improvements are recommended between Geelong and the Surf Coast Shire, to meet the community’s short and medium term needs and to improve the attractiveness of public transport travel over private car travel. However there is a longer term need for a dedicated transit corridor to be reserved between Torquay and Geelong to provide for a future high capacity public transport link, such as bus rapid transit, light rail or heavy rail.

Council needs to lobby VicRoads and DEDJTR to continue investigating a corridor reservation for the Torquay Transit Corridor to ensure a future high capacity public transport link can be delivered.

Action 3h – Lobby PTV to improve public transport connections between the Surf Coast and Geelong

The attractiveness of private car travel from Surf Coast to Geelong outweighs the currently available public transport alternatives. This is because of a range of factors including directness of travel, travel time, service frequency, the span of service hours, as well as passenger comfort and safety.

In order to improve public transport attractiveness between the Surf Coast and Geelong, Council needs to lobby PTV and work closely with the Surf Coast Shire to understand the improvements required and which of the above factors are the community’s highest priorities.

Action 3i – Work with V/Line and PTV to develop Station Access Plans for all stations within Geelong

The railway stations located within Geelong are key land use and transport nodes with strategic importance in the growth of Geelong as a regional city.

Council and V/Line need the guidance of an integrated, area-wide station access and transit oriented development strategy to continue to enhance the station precincts in the short to long term to meet the growing needs of Geelong’s rail network. The strategy will also provide the opportunity to improve transport and land use integration.

Developing a station access and development plan for each of the railway stations in Geelong, may consider:

  • Australian and international research into other approaches used in progressive cities of a similar size to Geelong, with a strong commuter demand, and proximity to a larger city such as Melbourne

  • details of opportunities for accessing the stations via different transport modes, incorporating DDA compliance

  • land use planning considerations, including residential and commercial densities

  • car parking rates that discourage private car use and encourage travel to the station by public transport or active transport.

Each of the station access plans would form part of the integrated area wide station access plan, and each would be developed considering the long-term Geelong rail corridor plan (see Action 3m).

Action 3j – Work with PTV, active transport groups and bus operators to improve the marketing of travel by non-car modes

Members of the Geelong community living in satellite towns and outer suburbs do not always have good awareness of the available options for travel by non-car modes, including public transport, cycling and walking. High quality, targeted marketing techniques can improve community awareness of alternative travel modes and reduce the reliance on private car travel into central Geelong.

A review of case studies from similar sized municipalities within Victoria, Australia and internationally, as well as engagement with key stakeholders, will provide insights into the ways equivalent satellite towns and outer suburbs are marketing non-car travel opportunities, and help generate effective strategies for marketing different transport modes to the Geelong community.

Action 3k – Develop a framework for prioritisation of infrastructure investment for actions outlined in this plan

The Council needs to consider how it will prioritise the various transport investment allocations – the levels, the assessment of transport needs, and how investment may vary between small, medium and large communities. In particular there is a need to consider how transport investment in Lara should be prioritised against investment made in Central Geelong.

This further investigation may benefit from a review of case studies from similar sized municipalities within Victoria, Australia or internationally to understand how transport investment decisions are made when there are different areas of need within communities. It will also require demographics analyses and stakeholder engagement to understand the transporT needs of different groups within the community.

Action 3l – Lobby PTV to develop a regional minimum service standard for public transport in Greater Geelong

Public transport services in satellite towns and outer suburbs within Geelong and other areas of regional Victoria are inconsistently allocated and are not based on a guideline for network coverage, service frequency, or span of hours.

As outlined in the G21 Public Transport Strategy, implementing this action includes the following key details:

  • setting standards for minimum service and minimum level of use to help communities within the City of Greater Geelong understand what levels of public transport service will be provided to them, and how much it will need to be patronised to ensure its long term support

  • consideration of a minimum number of weekday services, weekend services, and services to access the nearest local centre, Geelong and Melbourne

  • further consideration of the role of school buses in making spare seats available for student and concession card holders to travel, following trials undertaken in the Barwon region.

The focus of this recommendation within the G21 Public Transport Strategy is centred on regional towns within the five municipal councils that make up the G21 region. However, it is also important to provide minimum service standards for satellite towns within Geelong – townships on the Bellarine Peninsula, outer suburbs such as Lara, and areas such as Corio whose socio-economic status creates a higher need for improved public transport access.

Action 3m – Work with PTV and V/ Line to develop a long-term rail corridor plan

The Network Development Plan – Metropolitan Rail recommends that the rail line to Geelong be electrified within 20 years to become part of the Metropolitan rail network. The G21 Public Transport Strategy does not support this vision. Instead, it recommends development of an intercity rail line, as opposed to a suburban rail line that treats Geelong as an outer suburb of Melbourne. Providing a high class intercity service better reflects the G21 Regional Growth Plan and allows for regular ‘clockface’ timetabled services, but depends on high quality infrastructure to enable greater speed and capacity.

The G21 Strategy outlines the need to prepare a rail corridor development plan, which would include:

  • confirming a station hierarchy, and sites for future stations

  • identifying future level crossing removals

  • addressing capacity constraints

  • confirming planning outcomes for potential extensions to Torquay and Drysdale.

Action 3n – Implement the recommendations from the Central Geelong Car Parking and Access Strategy

The 2013 Central Geelong Car Parking and Access Strategy discussed the management of car parking throughout the Central Activity Area (CAA) and its impact on the area’s revitalisation.

In particular, the following recommendations align with its strategic interventions:

  • Adopt a Parking User Hierarchy – establish priorities for different uses of kerbside space. The hierarchy will help ensure that the limited space available is appropriately allocated.

  • Adopt a more stringent parking permit regulation scheme, including:

    • a charge for parking permits that are currently free to eligible residents, thereby discouraging residents from obtaining them, reducing overall parking and car ownership.

    • a method of ‘traceability’ to minimise misuse and abuse of the permit system.

    • denial of kerbside parking permits to residents of new developments, requiring developers to construct onsite parking.

  • Maintain or increase parking fees in the CAA. The primary purpose of parking fees is not to generate revenue but to manage the demand for the limited number of parking spaces available. Abolishing or reducing parking fees increases demand and congestion, and decreases parking availability throughout the CAA.

Action 3o – Implement the recommendations from the Geelong Road Safety Strategy

The City of Greater Geelong recognises the importance the community places on road safety, and is coordinating efforts to reduce the incidence and severity of road crashes and associated trauma.

The Geelong Road Safety Strategy is based on the “Safe System Approach” and is aligned to the Victorian Government’s Road Safety Strategy 2013-2022.

The Road Safety Strategy outlines a range of action plans under different categories. They highlight the challenges faced and detail programs that can be implemented to address the challenges. The challenges and programs are organised into one of the following four focus areas: Engineering, Education, Enforcement and Encouragement. A source or owner is allocated for each program and is responsible for implementation.

Action 3p – Implement the recommendations from the G21 Public Transport Strategy

The City of Greater Geelong recognises the importance of increasing the mode share for public transport in Geelong.

It has developed a Public Transport Strategy in conjunction with the G21 group. The G21 Public Transport Strategy’s goal is to increase public transport use, and in turn:

  • reduce traffic congestion

  • improve the environment

  • overcome social isolation.

The strategy developed the following four key objectives, derived through stakeholder and community consultation and by understanding the region’s existing and forecast demographics:

  • access for all

  • a well-connected region

  • urban public transport for an urban centre

  • improved information, planning and partnerships.

The strategy sets out a range of actions to achieve the public transport objectives, for implementation over the ensuing four-year period.

Action 3q – Work with PTV and V/Line to prioritise DDA improvements to bus and rail infrastructure

The Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport outline requirements and timeframes for making public transport accessible to people with a disability. The G21 Public Transport Strategy recommends disabled access to the central platform at Geelong Railway Station, which currently requires passengers with mobility aids or prams to be escorted across the tracks by station staff.

The Geelong Road Safety Strategy 2013 outlines a large number of infrastructure actions for meeting Geelong’s DDA requirements, including:

  • auditing all paths and road crossings to ensure DDA compliance

  • considering path separation where viable (new developments)

  • providing routes with high levels of infrastructure support for people with disabilities

  • providing lighting, shelters and seating at public transport stops (as required).





Page last updated: Friday, 21 December 2018

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