ICTP - Key challenges and issues

This Plan aims to address the key challenges and associated issues facing transport and land use planning within the City of Greater Geelong.

Identifying these key challenges and issues was an important task, which drew upon the following activities and sources:

  • Reviewing relevant background transport and land use planning documentation.

  • Consulting with stakeholders to confirm and reinforce findings of the background documentation review, and to identify other challenges, issues and opportunities.

  • Analysing baseline and future conditions to validate stakeholder consultation outcomes and to identify other challenges and issues.

  • Investment Logic Mapping to help identify key challenges, the benefits of addressing these challenges, and the strategic responses needed to address them.


Key challenges

The following key transport and land use challenges facing the City of Greater Geelong were identified through the information sources discussed above:

  • Challenge 1: Encouraging the community to reduce car use for local trips and be more physically active.

  • Challenge 2: Minimising the impact of freight movements on the community against a backdrop of economic growth.

  • Challenge 3: Insufficient capacity and/or connectivity hindering local and regional movement.

The following tables show evidence sourced from several background documents and stakeholder consultations, which justifies the inclusion of the key challenges and reinforces their importance in the Plan.


Challenge 1: Encouraging the community to reduce car use for local trips and be more physically active

The City of Greater Geelong culture is car dominated, generating excessive car use for local trips. Shifting to active travel modes will be encouraged as part of a wider initiative to improve the community health.


Challenge 1: Encouraging the community to reduce car use for local trips and be more physically active

Information source Justification
Background documentation review The draft G21 Public Transport Strategy 2013, states reduction of traffic congestion, through increasing the use of public transport as a goal.
The Central Geelong Car Parking and Access Strategy 2013 states that it is highly unlikely that the level of population growth forecast in the City of Greater Geelong can be accommodated with the existing car dominated mode split. It also acknowledges that the substantial increase in car-based trips has the potential to increase traffic congestion and delays.
Stakeholder consultation Feedback received in the two stakeholder workshops included a range of key issues and opportunities relating to car dependence in the City of Greater Geelong, and the need to encourage use of alternative modes for local trips.
Baseline and future conditions analysis Car ownership levels in the City of Greater Geelong have increased over the past ten years.
City of Greater Geelong residents make approximately 10,000 more journey-to-work trips than drivers 10 years ago.
84 per cent of all trips in the City of Greater Geelong are car-based trips, compared with Melbourne’s 77 per cent.
10 per cent of all car trips are for distances shorter than one kilometre; 25 per cent are shorter than two kilometres.
8,487 people in the City of Greater Geelong have diabetes. This represents a 90 per cent increase since 2002–09.


Challenge 2: Minimising the impact of freight movements on the community against a backdrop of economic growth

Over time, and for a number of commercial reasons, industrial areas within the City of Greater Geelong have become decentralised. This has created transport issues which could be mitigated to some degree by consolidating businesses that generate freight movements.

While these industrial areas contribute to the local Geelong economy, there is a need to minimise the impact of freight on the local community in terms of noise, air pollution, traffic congestion and road safety.


Challenge 2: Minimising the impact of freight movements on the community against a backdrop of economic growth

Information source Justification
Background documentation review The Geelong Central Transportation Links Study (2013) recommends mitigation measures for freight movements through central Geelong. The West Connect – Heales Road to Geelong Port Connection Preliminary Evaluation of Options study investigates an alternative freight route to connect the Heales Road industrial estate with the Geelong Port. This would reduce the impact of freight movements on residents in the northern suburbs of Geelong.
Stakeholder consultation The feedback received in the two stakeholder workshops supports the need to minimise the impact of freight movements on the community, especially in central Geelong and the northern suburbs. Adopting the Network Operating Plans in the City of Greater Geelong will introduce a road hierarchy that assigns priority to particular modes, creating the opportunity for a more targeted approach to transport network investment.
Baseline and future conditions analysis Total trade through the Geelong Port increased by 11.6 per cent in 2011–12, which included a 20.1 per cent increase in the number of vessels entering the Port during the period12. Freight movements through Geelong Port are forecast to grow from 12.5 million tonnes in 2011–12, to 50-60 million tonnes in 2050. In 2010, traffic counts undertaken on Malop Street (central Geelong) indicated that 1,018 trucks used this street in a 24-hour period. High Productivity Freight Vehicles such as the B-triple are vital to the Geelong Port’s trade growth and future efficiency – they would offer a competitive freight advantage that can unlock greater trade flows to Geelong.


Challenge 3: Insufficient capacity and/or connectivity hinders local and regional movement.

Adequate transport links that cater for active transport, public transport, private vehicle trips and freight are necessary for moving people and goods locally within the City of Greater Geelong, and regionally to external areas. These transport links currently have insufficient capacity and it impacts the movement of people and goods by reducing comfort, reliability and productivity. This represents a key challenge for the City of Greater Geelong as strong population growth is forecast to continue.

The growing population’s need for reliable links to employment, education, shopping and other destinations lies at the heart of this key challenge to improve connectivity within the transport network. Challenge 3: Insufficient capacity and/or connectivity hinders local and regional movement.


Challenge 3: Insufficient capacity and/or connectivity hinders local and regional movement.

Information source Justification
Background documentation review

The draft G21 Public Transport Strategy outlines four key strategic objectives for providing public transport in the region:

  • Access for all

  • A well connected region

  • Urban public transport for an urban centre

  • Improving information, planning and partnerships

A number of other documents recognise the importance of addressing Challenge 3, including:

  • Network Development Plan – Metropolitan Rail

  • Geelong Car Parking and Access Strategy

  • Road Management Plan

  • Geelong Road Safety Strategy

  • G21 Regional Road Transport Plan.

Stakeholder consultation Feedback received in the two stakeholder workshops related to insufficient transport capacity and connectivity, in turn hindering local and regional movement. Issues raised included overcrowding on peak period V/Line train services between Geelong and Melbourne, inadequate access to railway stations, inadequate public transport frequencies, as well as integration and road network capacity constraints on key transport links.
Baseline and future conditions analysis The City of Greater Geelong’s public transport network has limited connectivity, particularly for residents travelling from outer suburbs and towns to central Geelong and beyond (i.e. Lara and towns located on the Bellarine Peninsula). Anecdotal evidence suggests that travel demand on peak period Geelong - Melbourne V/Line train services exceeds capacity, causing discomfort for passengers. Surveys indicate that the park and ride car parks at Marshall, South Geelong, Geelong, North Geelong and Lara Stations are all operating at 100% occupancy.


Key issues

A number of key issues have been allocated to the three key challenges discussed. These issues were identified from the following sources:

  • Relevant background reports, plans and policies, as outlined in Figure 2-1.

  • Investment Logic Mapping outputs, including identification of the problem, benefits and strategic responses.

  • Outputs from the two stakeholder workshops held in Geelong, 4 December 2013.

  • Further analysis of the baseline and future conditions, as discussed in Section 3.1.

For the purpose of developing this Plan, an issue has been defined as a transport-related matter requiring intervention in order to meet the three key challenges.


Challenge 1 – Issues

Challenge 1: Encouraging the community to reduce car use for local trips and be more physicaly active.

Issue No. Description
1.1 Mode share in the City of Greater Geelong is excessively dominated by car use and a car culture generally exists amongst the community.
1.2 Pedestrian and cycle networks in the City of Greater Geelong are not comprehensive.
1.3 There are a number missing pedestrian and cycle links to key destinations in the City of Greater Geelong.
1.4 Pedestrian and cycle safety concerns may be limiting opportunities for increasing mode share for active transport.
1.5 Land use changes, such as the reduction in small neighbourhood shopping strips due to the increase in larger shopping centres has impacted the opportunity to use active transport for local trips.

Challenge 2 – Issues

Challenge 2: Minimising the impact of freight movements on the community against a backdrop of economic growth.

Issue No. Description
2.1 There is inadequate provision for East West freight movements through central Geelong.
2.2 Planning and transport related measures to mitigate the externalities (i.e. impacts on uninvolved third parties) associated with industrial activity are not always effective and do not keep pace with commercial and residential development
2.3 Access corridors to and from the Port need to be improved and protected to allow for High Productivity Freight Vehicles (HPFV)13.
2.4 Freight movements on local and arterial roads through the northern suburbs of Geelong are causing safety and amenity concerns among local residents.
2.5 Rail freight has a low market share, as it does not offer businesses an attractive alternative to road freight.
2.6 The dispersal of freight generating land uses increases the amount of Council related intervention needed to manage impacts on communities and deliver a road network that provides satisfactory access to business.
2.7 The shallow depth of the shipping channel that provides access to the Geelong Port reduces its attractiveness as a gateway for the import and export of freight.
2.8 Transport access to Melbourne Airport is unpredictable due to travel time reliability issues on the Princes Freeway and Ring Road
2.9 Planning for a rail link to Avalon Airport is necessary in order to meet Victoria’s future transport needs and support the development of Avalon into Victoria’s second international airport.


Challenge 3 – Issues

Challenge 3: Insufficient capacity and/or connectivity hinders local and regional movement.

Issue No. Description
3.1 Demand for rail travel to and from Melbourne, particularly during the weekday morning and evening peak periods, exceeds supply. It cannot be easily increased due to a number of network constraints including the Melbourne CBD rail loop and the Geelong rail tunnel/single track rail line, causing uncomfortable and unpredictable commutes.
3.2 V/Line rolling stock carriages are not space efficient and are not well suited to the task of moving large numbers of commuters. It is also important to achieve the right balance between carrying capacity and comfort.
3.3 The demand for skilled and highly paid jobs in the City of Greater Geelong exceeds supply, in turn increasing Melbourne-related commuting.
3.4 There is a lack of transport link resilience between Geelong and Melbourne.
3.5 Traffic congestion on West Gate Freeway reduces travel time reliability to Melbourne during weekday morning peak periods and Geelong afternoon peak periods.
3.6 Transport demand between Geelong and the Surf Coast exceeds capacity, causing road congestion during the weekday peak periods and during the peak holiday season.
3.7 Car trips dominate railway station access. It creates congestion, is inefficient, and is costly, as it requires large amounts of land for parking.
3.8 There are limited transport options by non-car modes from satellite towns and suburbs within the study area to central Geelong.
3.9 The absence of a hierarchy of transport modes within the City of Greater Geelong reduces the opportunity to develop a coordinated transport system.
3.10 Demography has changed and historical approaches to transport investment no longer align with existing and emerging transport needs.
3.11 Limited east-west road connections through central Geelong result in travel time reliability and access issues.
3.12 Excessive demand for seats on the morning peak-hour train to Melbourne, creates inefficient and indirect travel patterns as people living in northern Geelong drive to station car parks in the south.
3.13 Proposals prepared by PTV for the Geelong rail line (as outlined in the Network Development Plan) are not aligned within the Council-supported draft G21 Public Transport Strategy Vision.
3.14 Parking management strategies in central Geelong are encouraging people to make car trips.
3.15 During 2007–11, there were 39 fatal crashes and 849 serious injury crashes on City of Greater Geelong roads, representing a reduction in fatality crashes from the previous five years, but an increase in serious injury crashes. Council aims to achieve a 30 per cent reduction in fatal and serious injury crashes in the next five years within the City of Greater Geelong.
3.16 The City of Greater Geelong is not consistently Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) compliant, which limits transport choices and opportunities for some members of the community.



12 Source: Enterprise Geelong - Economic Indicators [Back to report section]
13 HPFV’s are 30 metres in length and can carry two, 40-foot shipping containers, therefore reducing the volume of freight movements on road by carrying more freight. [Back to report section]




Page last updated: Friday, 21 December 2018

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